We have just gotten a wake-up call from the Nintendo Generation.

This morning while absorbing large amounts of caffeine in a vain attempt to wake from a turkey induced coma, I came across an interesting article over on Tech News World on the Internet of Things.  As some of you know, prior to joining the connected world of telecom, I actually spent awhile in the security space.  Just long enough to adopt the constant state between paranoia and acceptance of the fact that everything is a security risk, much like my fellow security brethren.

So when I came across this article on the Internet of Things and the wonderful world of security as it relates to this new(ish) trend, it couldn’t help but intrigue me.  Because well, whenever society gets a new toy to play with, you know there is a beautiful dark cloud of exploitation just around the corner.  The internet of Things is wonderful, and it’s going to be a huge headache for security folks.  Welcome to the (Unsecured) Internet of Things. Continue reading

Greetings, my friend. We are all interested in the future, for that is where you and I are going to spend the rest of our lives. And remember my friend, future events such as these will affect you in the future.

As someone who spends a lot of time perusing both Reddit and the now sadly defunct Google Reader (RIP!), I’m not personally surprised to start seeing a lot of discussions around whether corporations who outsource cloud storage or other services to third parties should be worried about privacy risks.

For example, an article this morning from the folks over at ZD brings up some great points about both the pros and cons about the great cloud race and how it could ultimately affect how data ownership is perceived. Continue reading

This caused the 1977 New York blackout. A practical joke by the great attractor. He thought it was funny as hell.

Most of Canada and the US’s power, water and manufacturing facilities leverage some kind of industrial control system (ICS). These systems are usually built on Windows and have some kind of front end backing onto the Internet, which means they are prime targets for web based attacks. Continue reading

Well, it’s a wonderful device nonetheless, despite the poorly written instruction manual.

OK, I’ll admit it. I love cloud storage. Not huge, datacentre style stuff, just simple stuff like Dropbox. Why? Well, mostly because it makes keeping things available on all devices a lot easier, and honestly, it makes me way more productive. In fact, it makes employees as a whole way more productive. So why aren’t more organizations touting these solutions? Continue reading

It’s 106 miles to Chicago, we’ve got a full tank of gas, half a pack of cigarettes, it’s dark and we’re wearing sunglasses.

With the long weekend looming (well, technically starting today) I thought I would do a nice light post about the state of third party security and virtualization. I still have this debate once and awhile about what is better, vendor integrated solutions such as vShield, or third party solutions from security vendors. So what are the arguments for each side? Continue reading

Passwords are like underwear. You shouldn’t leave them out where people can see them. You should change them regularly. And you shouldn’t loan them out to strangers.

It’s funny when I see articles around security that focus on how Anti-Virus is the key to computer security. I know that yes, the risks from malware and virus-laden attachments are a pain in the butt for security professionals, and even regular computer users, but is A/V really the key to computer security? If you ask me, it’s really about education and process than anything. Continue reading

May the Odds be Ever in Your Favor.

It’s been awhile since I’ve written about security, but last week I came across a really great (but frightening) example of how security is affected with virtual environments. An organization who was running a virtual environment suddenly lost access to their entire infrastructure. It wasn’t a result of a badly configured virtual environment, it was arguably one of the first examples that I have come across of an attack against a virtual environment. I don’t know if it was intentional, but it’s a very interesting story of just how the threat landscape is adapting.

Essentially what happened was that the Windows server their virtual environment was running on had suffered a malware infection. The worst thing was that it was a known exploit, but hadn’t been patched. What the exploit did was cause the server to hit the network stack with enough traffic to cause a DDoS attack against the management console. This brought not just everything down, but rendered the environment unavailable.

Can you imagine if this type of vulnerability happens in production environment, such as in a financial or e-commerce organization? Aside from the financial ramifications of not being available to customers, but if you couldn’t recover any of your data? This type of attack could theoretically cause irreparable damage to a company.

I know the whole concept of securing virtual environments is a new thing. I work with several research groups within the Cloud Security Alliance so I am aware of just how little information there is out there as it relates to best practices. But when a real-world example of how these types of attacks are starting to affect virtual environments, it makes it clear just how important these conversations are.

Now I am not sure what happened to the organization who was the unfortunate victim of the attack. I hope that the fact that they figured out it was a network issue means that once the vulnerability is patched the VMs can be restarted. But I doubt that this is a rare and isolated example, which means that it is officially time for security and infrastructure folks to step up their game.