Why don’t you cut the cute act, Danny boy, and tell me what it is you’re looking for?

Perhaps the biggest complexity when it comes to adopting cloud services is to manage the health and security of the cloud service.  For organizations who build their own internal clouds, the burden of security and management falls solely on the organization’s fine IT folks, but what happens when you outsource the environment?  Are you still required for all the care and feeding?  Is there a better way? Continue reading

Alright, I’ll do it. But do me one last favor, will you. Can you give me two hours? That’s all I ask man, just two hours to sleep before tomorrow. I suspect it’s going to be a very difficult day.

If Cloud adoption from a business perspective was easy, this blog wouldn’t exist.  Nor would the thousands of other tireless folks working on helping advance cloud standards from compliance to security to data and resource integrity.  But when these businesses who do bravely go into the new cloud world, if it’s anything less than perfect, they face criticism from the entire IT community.  Is this why we are seeing a resistance to move to cloud for many organizations?  And what does this mean for the future of the cloud industry?
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I’ll be honest with you, I love his music. I do. I’m a Michael Bolton fan. For my money, I don’t know if it gets any better than when he sings “When a Man Loves a Woman”.

I recently came across a post that probably caught a lot of attention from IT folks. It basically talked about the death of Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS). The ironic thing is that IaaS is one of the most (if not THE most) available cloud services available. So why the little love for such a service? If you ask me, it’s because it’s like being half-pregnant. This is why.

So what are the main reasons for organizations to adopt cloud? Cost is a big one, since yes, if you subscribe to a service you save all the nasty upfront purchase fees, leverage OPEX over CAPEX and don’t have to worry about care and feeding costs (power, cooling, etc). The other reason is that organizations just want to outsource their storage and computing power to eliminate the hassles of managing it in-house.

So if you follow the logic, why are these organizations looking at IaaS? They still would need to be responsible for security, care and feeding of the O/S and programs. You’ve actually complicated things a little bit as the servers are off-site. Why wouldn’t you then just upgrade to Platform as a Service (PaaS), have the cloud provider handle all the security and compliance (written into the SLA ofcourse) and just worry about the actual programs running on the cloud boxes? Doesn’t it make more sense to delegate more of the responsibility to maintain the computing environment to the provider and make it easier on your IT team to take care of all the other IT tasks that are more business-focused such as upgrading billing systems or customer centric services?

Don’t get me wrong. There are some great cases for IaaS, but I just don’t understand why this type of service has become the dominant one when PaaS and SaaS makes more sense to me. Any ideas?

I’m not anti-social; I’m just not user friendly.

I read a great article recently pinning cloud solutions versus on-premise to see what the experts anticipate will be the new widely adopted service model. As someone who comes from the on-premise security business, and being in the midst of figuring out the best way to transition traditional solutions to cloud delivered ones, this is a very important argument. After all, just about every organization has used the on-premise model for security, so why is cloud a better decision moving forward? Continue reading